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1.  
Use timelines to find holes in your research.
[Located in Category: How To]
2.  
Maps of all kinds are important to your family research.
[Located in Category: How To]
3.  
An emigrant is a person who leaves a country to reside in another counry.
[Located in Category: How To]
4.  
Check home sources, e.g. old letters, post cards, family Bibles, for clues to your immigrant ancestor.
[Located in Category: How To]
5.  
Contact relatives looking for family documents, letters, diaries, etc. to aid in your research.
[Located in Category: How To]
6.  
Purchase a German-English dictionary for your German genealogy reference library.
[Located in Category: How To]
7.  
Consult original records. Look for records kept at the local or national leve in the U.S. which may reveal your immigrant ancestor's hometown.
[Located in Category: How To]
8.  
Research your ancestor's hometown on a map and determine the juristiction where records were kept.
[Located in Category: How To]
9.  
Search church records from your ancestor's hometown.
[Located in Category: How To]
10.  
Before you try to "cross the pond" you must know the name of the specific place (city town, village) where your immigrant lived.
[Located in Category: How To]
11.  
Familiarize yourself with resources available for German genealogy from the nearest Family History Center or by using the Library Catalog on their website (www.familysearch.org).
[Located in Category: How To]
12.  
Seek out German genealogy societies in the United States. Many have excellent information available and their membership is usually quite inexpensive.
[Located in Category: How To]
13.  
Exhaust all U.S. records before you try to "cross the pond."
[Located in Category: How To]
14.  
Research U.S. birth, marriage and death records for important information.
[Located in Category: How To]
15.  
Research church records in the are where your family lived in the U.S. for Baptisms/Christenings, Marriages, Death and Burial records for important information.
[Located in Category: How To]
16.  
Check the U.S. Federeal Census for 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930. There is information about immigration there!
[Located in Category: How To]
17.  
Probate records provide a wealth of information for listing heirs (spouse and children) and determining family relationships.
[Located in Category: How To]
18.  
Land and property records give you a peek into your ancestor's life.
[Located in Category: How To]
19.  
German church records are almost the only primary source of records before 1875.
[Located in Category: How To]
20.  
Remember... there was no "Germany" as we know it until 1871. Before that, there were small kingdoms, duchies, dukedoms, etc.
[Located in Category: How To]
21.  
Catholic Church records were written in Latin until the early 19th century.
[Located in Category: How To]
22.  
Church registers began between 1530 and 1750 to record religious events associated with baptisms, marriages and burials of persons living in its respective parishes.
[Located in Category: How To]
23.  
In the early 1800’s the popular departure ports for southern Germans were Antwerp, Rotterdam, and Le Havre.
[Located in Category: Ports]
24.  
In 1852 Bremen replaced Le Havre as the port of choice for German people.
[Located in Category: Ports]
25.  
Many family members sailed from the same port previous family members sailed from.
[Located in Category: Ports]
26.  
Bremen started departure lists in 1832 but after 1874 any list over 2 years old was destroyed. Some lists have been reconstructed. They cover the years: 1847 - 1854, 1855 - 1862, 1863 - 1867, and 1868 - 1871. They only include emigrants where a specific place of origin was given.
[Located in Category: Ports]
27.  
Hamburg’s police and port authorities kept lists of ship passengers from 1850 – 1913. These lists are arranged by direct and indirect lists.
[Located in Category: Ports]
28.  
Freedom of religion was the reason many emigrants gave for leaving Germany.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
29.  
Freedom from wars and military service was a big reason for people leaving Germany because military service was mandatory.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
30.  
There was a lack of land in areas where farms had been divided many times among surviving children. The small plots of land could not support a family.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
31.  
Dreams of a united, democratic Germany never seemed to come about.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
32.  
People were invited to come to American and settle on its frontiers and work in its factories.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
33.  
As the steamships shortened the crossing time more people traveled.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
34.  
The letters from others who made the trip were full of reasons why other family members should join them.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
35.  
Between 1830 and 1845 rising prices, revolutions, and the cholera epidemic were reasons for people to leave Germany.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
36.  
Between 1850 and 1855 it became easier to emigrate because railroad and ship lines' fares were cheaper.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
37.  
In the 1860's the news spread to Germany about the Homestead Act of 1862.
[Located in Category: Emigration]
38.  
The life expectancy of Prussian male in 1816 was 26.5 years, a woman 28.7 years. By 1865 - 1867 the figures were 32.4 for men and 34.9 for women.
[Located in Category: Medical Practices]
39.  
In some areas one third of the babies died before their first birthday and about one third of the children died before their tenth birthday.
[Located in Category: Medical Practices]
40.  
For breakfast (Frstuck) there are fresh rolls with butter, cheese, or jam; or bread with butter, sausage, cheese or ham. This is served with coffee or tea. Children drink milk. For weekends and special occasions there may be a special pastry or soft-boiled egg.
[Located in Category: German Foods]
41.  
For a mid morning snack (Brotzeit - bread trim) there will be a slice of bread or a fresh roll with butter and cheese. Sometimes a cucumber, radish or sausage may be added along with coffee, tea or fruit juice.
[Located in Category: German Foods]
42.  
The largest meal (Mittagessen) of the day is served between noon and 2 P.M. A soup, salad, fish or meat dish, vegetable and maybe, dessert are served. Beverages include beer wine, fruit juice or mineral water without ice.
[Located in Category: German Foods]
43.  
Late afternoon is time for coffee and cake or tore (Kaffee und Kuchen or Torten). Strong coffee is sometimes served with cream or whipped cream. German cakes are varied and may include cheesecakes, or a fancy torte such as Black Forest Cherry Cake.
[Located in Category: German Foods]
44.  
The evening meal (Abendessen) is usually a simple, at home meal with bread, butter, cheese, sausage or other meat, a salad or fruit with beer, wine, coffee, tea, fruit juice or mineral water.
[Located in Category: German Foods]
45.  
German Social Classes - The kings, bishops and nobility were at the top of the list of three classes in Germany in the 17th and 18 centuries.
[Located in Category: German Social Classes]
46.  
German Social Classes - The second class was the shopkeepers, artisans and servants that worked in the towns or cities
[Located in Category: German Social Classes]
47.  
German Social Classes - The bottom class was the goat and swine herders, shepherds, ploughmen, milkmaids, common peasants and the serfs. They had no surnames and made up the largest percentage of the population.
[Located in Category: German Social Classes]
48.  
German Social Classes - Peasant uprisings were common and attempts to improve conditions were tried in 1476, 1493, 1502, 1513, 1514, 1517 and 1524. They were all defeated.
[Located in Category: German Social Classes]
49.  
It was not until the 1100's that surnames were added to further distinguish all those with the same first name.
[Located in Category: German Names]
50.  
Germans were fond of using double names like Johann Heinrich, Johann Christian, Anna Christine, or Anna Margaretha. Only the third name was different because that is the name they used every day. For example: Wilhelm Fredrich Gottlieb, Wilhelm Fredrich Martin, Wilhelm Fredrich Christian, or Wilhelm Fredrich Carl.
[Located in Category: German Names]