Willkommen!
Herzlich willkommen in alle deutschen Genealogen!
 
Fröhliche Weihnachten!
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Annual Seminar

Annual SWFLGG Seminar
Presenting
 
Kory Meyerink
Noted Genealogist and Popular Lecturer
"Accessing New Sources for German Research"
Saturday, January 24, 2015
24 Twenty-One Event Center
2421 Tamiami Trail - Port Charlotte, FL
 
For more information and registration form, CLICK HERE.
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The Next Meeting of SWFLGG

Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 10:30 am
Mid-County Regional Library
2050 Forrest Nelson Boulevard - Port Charloote, FL
PROGRAM
 "See What SWFLGG.ORG Can Do for You!"
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The Tannenbaum

The German Tannenbaum is usually put up and decorated on Christmas Eve. Traditionally, the Germans used the fir tree. Decorations  included tinsel, glass balls or straw ornaments and sweets. A star or an angel tops the Tannenbaum, and beneath the tree, a nativity scene might be set up and the presents next to it. Germans also usually continue to use real lit candles instead of electric lights on the tree.

The first known Christmas tree was set up in 1419 in Freiburg by the town bakers, who decorated the tree with fruits, nuts, and baked goods, which the children were allowed to remove and eat on New Year's Day. The town guilds and associations first brought evergreens inside their guild houses and decorated them with apples and sweets. Candles were eventually added to the decorations. Since the Middle Ages, ordinary Germans had been bringing any plant that maintained its green color through the lifeless and dreary winter months - into their homes. Even in areas where forests were sparse, the tradition took hold; people in Northern Germany, for instance, used Christmas pyramids (Weihnachtspyramiden) in lieu of Christmas trees. The pyramid form was created using sticks that were then decorated with fir branches. By 1800, the custom of bringing a tree into the home was firmly established in many German-speaking regions and continued to spread throughout Europe, and eventually, around the world. The custom was brought to North America by German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania and Ohio in the 18th century.

The Tannenbaum is taken down on New Year's Day or on January 6th, Three King's Day, at which time the children can ransack the tree for the sweets and treats that decorated it.

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Websites to check!

 
"Internet Sources for German research" by Kory Meyerink
 
A "How-To" Manual for the new FamilySearch website
 
Have you checked the "Links" on this website?  
There are so many that could be of help to you!

Of Interest...


General Meeting
January 10, 2015 - 10:30 am - Mid-County Regional Library, Port Charlotte

Searching for your German Ancestry
Check the many new German records on Ancestry.com. You'll be busy... busy... busy!

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